Value Based Decisions


We make ’em every day.

Do we want this product knowing that if we buy it, we won’t be able to have that product.

This for that.

Is it worth it for me?

The same analysis occurs when purchasing many many things.

It certainly is reasonable to apply that same thinking to health insurance.

What’s surprising is that some people get upset when they are held responsible for that trade off:

Cary, N.C. — Don Corne has had severe intestinal problems for weeks, but he cannot afford to see a doctor about it.

Corne, a contractor in the maintenance and operations division of the Wake County Public School System, is among the more than 21 percent of adults in North Carolina who don’t have health insurance.

“Here I sit with something that needs to be dealt with or diagnosed, and if you don’t have this ticket called insurance or you don’t have a lot of money, then you can’t find out,” he said.

“Premiums I’ve gotten (quotes on) are anywhere from $300 to $400 a month, and that’s just so expensive. I can’t afford that,” he said of individual coverage.

Normally stories like this are done on  people suffering from rare, dead and exotic diseases.  The wrinkle being that their condition makes it emotionally impossible to criticize their poor decision making abilities.  Or rather, for pointing out that the place they find themselves in is entirely of their own doing.

This is not the case for poor Mr. Corne.

He paid $49 to go to a clinic in Apex, where he was told he needed to see a gastroenterologist for a proper diagnosis. That visit would likely cost about $1,500, he was told.

Mr. Corne has simply made a value based decision.  He decided that rather than “pissing away” $300-$400 a month, he would rather keep that and invest that money, or some portion of it, into an account that he could dip into should he ever need medical care.

The fact that he acted only on the “not pissing away” portion of his decision and not the “invest it in an account” should not be the fault of the system.

Had Mr. Corne saved just 5 months of the cheap version of health insurance, he could have self insured himself and been even after just FIVE months.  FOUR if he based his savings on the $400 per month variety.

America does not have a “medical delivery” system problem.  It has a “personal responsibility” problem.

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4 comments
  1. truss said:

    I am the person you are referring to in this article. First off, you make many assumptions in order to get your point across at my expense. Even if I pissed away $49 to go the the clinic to see a Dr. that is a far cry difference from $300-$400 a month you somehow think I have. You infer that there is $300-$400 per month there to “piss away”,
    “dip into”, or “invest”. It isn’t.,,so don’t go making “value bases decisions” against me and others to further your black and white agenda. News stories are often sound bites and don’t give all the details of a situation. I was hesitant in doing it for that reason, but my goal was to bring awareness to the high cost of healthcare, not to get sympathy for my financial situation, or infer that the government should come bail me out with free healthcare.
    Furthermore, I am a Conservative as well. I do not believe in Obamacare, nor do I think it’s the government’s responsibility to provide a “medical delivery” system solution. Despite my situation, I still feel it is ones “personal responsibility” to take care of and provide for themselves. Unfortunately, some times we all need help during difficult times. My point was that those of us who do work, are trying to be responsible and not live off of welfare, get lost in the cracks and don’t qualify for assistance when it may be a legitimate need.

    • pino said:

      I am the person you are referring to in this article.

      Hello truss. First, I hope that your condition has improved and you find yourself in fine health.

      Even if I pissed away $49 to go the the clinic to see a Dr. that is a far cry difference from $300-$400 a month you somehow think I have.

      The main point of the post is that people feel insurance is a scam. That if they buy it and pay for it, yet never use it, they have wasted money. That isn’t the case.

      You infer that there is $300-$400 per month there to “piss away”,
      “dip into”, or “invest”. It isn’t.,,so don’t go making “value bases decisions” against me and others to further your black and white agenda.

      Every now and then I get asked questions at work about what people should do with regard to their health insurance needs. In every single case the individual is healthy and doesn’t wanna pay the premium for a service they feel they’ll never use. In each of those cases I urge them to purchase “catastrophic coverage”. This is an ultra-cheap policy that carries a $5,000 – $10,000 deductible. THEN i urge them to set aside money, pre-tax, into an HSA account. This allows people to put money in an investment account and grow it tax free.

      Even $10 a month for just 18 months would have covered your described dilemma.

      Furthermore, I am a Conservative as well. I do not believe in Obamacare, nor do I think it’s the government’s responsibility to provide a “medical delivery” system solution. Despite my situation, I still feel it is ones “personal responsibility” to take care of and provide for themselves.

      Most excellent news!

      My point was that those of us who do work, are trying to be responsible and not live off of welfare, get lost in the cracks and don’t qualify for assistance when it may be a legitimate need.

      truss, I sincerely hope that you have emerged from your difficult time nearly 2 years ago.

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