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Monthly Archives: January 2011

As the world watches what’s going on in Egypt, we need to keep this in mind.

That we believe all men are free and are governed at their will.  A government that restricts that Liberty must be checked, and if not, removed.

If we allow the Liberty of those people living in Egypt too be taken from them because we fear the alternative we will have become Democrats!

Liberty.  by law!

Mr. Tata starts his new job today as Superintendent of Wake County Public Schools.

Many folks have criticized the hiring of Tata, saying there:

…are concerns from the public, educators and some school board members that Tata might not be the right person to lead the school system because of his lack of experience in the education sector.

I, for one, find that lack of experience in the Education sector critical to his success.  He’ll be able to come into his role clear of the bias of the industry.  He won’t have preconceived buy in’s to institutional methods and means.  He’ll be fresh and he’ll be excited.

Here are the things I would like Tata to work on:

  1. Eliminate the bottom 10% lowest performing teachers.
  2. Merit based pay.
  3. Create mentor teachers.  Promote them and pay them more, lots more.  This role should span multiple schools.
  4. Settle the assignment process.
  5. Graduate more kids.

Good luck Mr. Tata, you have a tough road ahead of you.

Well, virtually everything.  This includes making money.

And now for the latest in 21st century news, women are even better at getting elected than men:

AMERICAN politics has a glass ceiling that keeps women down. This is a wisdom so conventional that Hillary Clinton, in conceding to Barack Obama in 2008, could safely earn cheers and tears by thanking her supporters for those “18m cracks in it.”

The only trouble is that empirical analysis has not found a bias against female candidates. In fact, a new study in California suggests that voters are, if anything, biased in favour of women. That glass thing in American politics, in other words, might be an elevator, not a ceiling.

In the Democratic races, women fared much better than men. This might be expected, because voters seem to associate women with more “liberal” issues (starting with, well, women’s issues), and Democratic primary voters tend to be liberal. More surprising, perhaps, were the results of the Republican primaries. Conservative voters tend to be more concerned with allegedly manly issues such as law and order and defence. This should put female candidates at a disadvantage. But it didn’t. Even among Republicans, a male name carried no advantage.

In half of the political races, women had an advantage.  In the other half, there was no advantage to be had; for men OR for women.

It might be time to put the bras back on ladies.